Peace negotiations between Maroons and British soldiers on the island of St. Vincent, 1773. Engraving from an original painting by Agostino Brunias, about 1786. Courtesy of National Library of Jamaica


. . . And so the Maroons think so much of our treaty . . . we think that it is one of the greatest things in the world because we know that it was not given to us; we won the treaty from the British."

— Colonel C.L.G. Harris, leader of the Windward Maroons, Moore Town, Jamaica, 1992

 

 

 

 

 

Maroon captain Leonard Parkinson. Cover print of The Proceedings of the Governor and Assembly of Jamaica in Regard to the Maroon Negroes by Bryan Edwards, 1796. Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution Libraries


" . . . We made a pledge with ourselves that we would never again be slaves."

— Colonel C.L.G. Harris, leader of the Windward Maroons,
Moore Town, Jamaica, 1992

 

 

Propagandist wood engravings like this one illustrating the Dade Massacre (1835-36) and the onset of the Second Seminole War (1835-42) were intended to inflame European and Euro-American fears of both Native Americans and Africans.

Massacre of the Whites by the Indians and Blacks in Florida, 1836. Courtesy of Library of Congress


" If the Maroons had been defeated, meaningful black resistance to the indignity and cruelty of African slavery would have ended . . . ."

— Colonel C.L.G. Harris, leader of the Windward Maroons, Moore Town, Jamaica, 1992

Have a look at the historical timeline.